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1664


January
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<17>: ... And this day was my Wife brought to bed of a sonn borne exactly at 2 in the afternoone: blessed be God for this mercy to her, who had ceased from bearing some yeares:
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27 Was Christned my sonn Richard [2d. of that name] by his Grandfather Sir Rich: Browne, my Lord Vicount Mordaunt & my Lady Warwick being Sponsors &c: Dr. Breton officiating in the greate Chamber at Says Court.
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February
10 To Lond: my Sylva being now in the presse:
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16. I went to Lond: presented my Sylva to the Society. & 17: To his Majestie to whom it was dedicated, to my Lord Treasurer, & Lord Chancellor:
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26: Din'd at my Lord Chancellors who invited me. Thence to Court, where I had greate thanks for my Sylva & long discourse with him of divers particulars.
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March
2 I went to Lond, to distribute some of my Books amongst friends, return'd:
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6 ... This Spring I planted the home field & West field about Says-Court, with Elmes;
being the same Yeare that the Elmes were also planted by his Majestie in Greenewich park.
9 I went to the Tower of Lond, to sit in Commission about regulating the Mint, & now it as the fine new Milled Coyne both of White-mony & Ginnies was established: returnd:
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26: It pleased God to take-away my sonn Richard, being now a moneth old, yet without any sicknesse of danger perceivable, being to all appearance a most likely child; so as we suspected the Nurse had over-layne him to our extreame sorrow, being now againe reduc'd to one: Gods will be don:
27: our Curate on: 11: Matt: 28: After evening prayer was my child buried neere the rest of his brothers, my deare children:
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April
17: ... In the afternoone I went with Sir Sam. Tuke to Epsam, & staied with my Bro: at Woodcot 'til tuesday, when Sir R: Browne & my Wife fetched me home in the Coach:
27: To Lond about buisinesse: supp'd at Mr. Secretary Bennets; saw a facecious Comedy Cald Love in a Tub, returnd on the 30th.
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May
5 I went with some company a journey of Pleasur on the Water, in barge, with Musick & at Mortlack had a greate banquet, returning late: The occasion was Sir Robert Carr now Courting Mrs. Bennet, sister to the secretary of state &c:
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June
8 I went to our Society, to which his Majestie had sent that wonderfull horne of the fish, which struck a dangerous hole in the keele of a ship, in the India Sea, which being broake off with the violence of the fish, & left in the timber, preserv'd it from foundring:
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22 One Tomson a Jesuite shewed me such a <Collection> of rarities, sent from the Jesuites of Japan & China to their order at Paris (as a present to be reserved in their Chimelium, but brought to Lond; with the East India ships for them) as in my life I had not seene: The chiefe things were very large Rhinoceros's hornes, Glorious Vests, wrought & embrodered on cloth of Gold, but with such lively colours, as for splendor & vividnesse we have nothing in Europe approches: A Girdill studdied with achats, & balast rubies of greate value & size, also knives of so keene edge as one could not touch them, nor was the mettal of our Couler but more pale & livid: Fanns like those our Ladys use, but much larger, & with long handles curiously carved, & filled with Chineze Characters: A sort of paper very broad thin, & fine like abortive parchment, & exquisitely polished, of an amber yellow, exceeding glorious & pretty to looke on, & seeming to be like that which my L: Verulame describes in his Nova Atlantis; with severall other sorts of papers some written, others Printed: Also prints of Landskips, of their Idols, Saints, Pagoods, of most ougly Serpentine, monstrous & hideous shapes to which they paie devotion: Pictures of Men, & Countries, rarely painted on a sort of gumm'd Calico transparant as glasse: also Flowers, Trees, Beasts, birds &c: excellently wrought in a kind of sleve-silk very naturall. Divers Drougs that our Drougists & physitians could make nothing of: Especialy, one which the Jesuite called Lac Tygridis, it look'd like a fungus, but was weighty like metall: yet was a Concretion or coagulation of some other matter:...
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July
7: To Court, where I subscribed to Sir Arthyr Slingsbys loterey, a desperate debt owing me long since in Paris:
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14: I went to take leave of the two Mr. Howards now going to Paris & brought them as far as Bromely, thence to Eltham to see Sir John Shaws new house now building, the place is pleasant, if not too wett, but the house not well contrived, especialy the roofe, & roomes too low pitch'd, & Kitchins where the Cellars should be: The Orangerie & Aviarie handsome, & a very large plantation about it.1
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19. To Lond. to see the event of the Lottery, which his Majestie had permitted Sir Arth: Slingsby to set up for one day in the Banqueting house at whitehall: I gaining onely a trifle, as well as did the King, Queene Consort, & Q: Mother for neere 30 lotts: which was thought to be contriv'd very un-handsomely by the master of it, who was in truth a meer shark:


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August
3 Aug: To Lond: This day was a Consort of Excellent Musitians espe<c>ialy one Mr. Berkenshaw that rare artist, who invented a mathematical way of composure very extraordinary: True as to the exact rules of art, but without much harmonie.
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8. came the sad and unexpected newes of my Lady Cotton, Wife to my Bro: Geo: a most excellent Lady:
9: I went to Lond: & thence with my Bro: Richard to Wotton to visi<t>e & comfort my disconsolate Bro:...
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22. I went back to Wotton to assist at the Funerall of my sister-in Law, the Lady Cotton buried in our Dormitorie there, she being put up in Lead: Dr. Owen preaching ... a profitable & pathetic discourse, concluding with an Elogie of that virtuous, pious, & deserving Lady &c: it was a very solemn funerall of about 50 mourners: I came back next day: with my Wife to Lond:
25. To Deptford: my foote-man lingering at some distance behind the Coach, was robb'd, & bound <it> being night:
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October
5. To Lond: at our Society Experiments on severall bodys descent in Water, by vibrations of a pendule, also was brought a new invented Instrument of Musique, being an harpsichord with gut-Strings, sounding like a Consort of Viols with an Organ, made vocal by a Wheele, & a Zone of parchment that rubb'd horizontaly against the Strings:
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15 Dined, at L: Chancelors, where was also the Duke of Ormond, Earle of Cork, and Bishop of Winchester: After dinner my Lord Chancellor & Lady carried me in their Coach to see their Palace (for now he lived at Worcester-house in the Strand) building at the upper end of St. James's Streete; & to project the Garden: Then went with my Lady to St. James's house to see her Grand-Children, the Lady Mary & a sonn, &c, children of the Dutchesse of Yorke; & this Evening presented his Lordship with my booke of Architecture, as before I had don to his Majestie & Queene Mother, both of whom were pleasd to say it was the usefullest booke on that subject of any extant: My L: Chamberlaine caused me to stay with him in his bed chamber, discoursing of severall matters, very late, even 'til he was going into his bed:
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17. I went with my L: V. Count Cornbury to Cornebury in Oxfordshire, to assist the Planting of the Park & beare him company, with Mr. Belin, both virtuous & friendly Gent: also with Mr. May, in Coach & six horses, din'd at Uxbridge, lay at Wicckam:
18 at Oxford, went through Woodstock where we beheld the destruction of that Royal Seate & Park by the late Rebels; & ariv'd that Evening at Cornbury, an house built by the Earle of Denby, in the middle of a Sweete dry Park walled with a Dry-wall: The house of excellent free stone, abounding in that park, a stone that is fine, but never swets or casts any damp: tis of ample receite, has goodly Cellars, the paving of the hall admirable, for the close laying of the Pavement: We design'd an handsome Chapell that was yet wanting, as Mr. May had the stables which indeede are very faire, having set out the Walkes in the Park, & Gardens: The Lodge is a prety solitude, and the Ponds very convenient; The Park well stored. Hence on the 20: we went to see the famous Wells natural, & artificial Grotts & fountains calld Bushells Wells at Ensham: this Bushell had ben Secretary to my L: Verulam: It is an extraordinary solitude: There he had two Mummies, a Grott where he lay in an hamac like an Indian: Hence we went to Dichley an antient seate of the Lees, now Sir Hen: Lees, a low antient timber house, with a pretty bowling greene: My Lady gave us an extraordinary dinner: This Gent: Mother was Countesse of Rochester, who was also there, & Sir Walt: Saint Johns: There were some pictures of their ancestors not ill Painted; the Gr: Grandfather had ben Knight of the Gartyr, also the Picture of a Pope & our Saviours head: so we returned to Cornbury:
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24: We dined at Sir Tim: Tyrills at Shotover: this Gent married the daughter & heyre of Bishop Usher A:B: of Armagh that learned Prælate: th<e>y made a greate entertainement: There is here in the Grove, a fountain of the coldest water I ever felt: 'tis very cleere, his plantations of Oakes &c is commendable: so we went this Evening to Oxford, lay at Dr. Hides Principal of Magdalen Hall (related to my L:) bro: to the L: Ch: Justice, and that Sir Henry Hide that lost his head for his Loyalty: we were handsomly entertained two dayes.
25 ... I went to visite Mr. Boyle now here, whom I found with Dr. Wallis & Dr. Chr: Wren in the Tower at the Scholes, with an inverted Tube or Telescope observing the Discus of the Sunn for the passing of Mercury that day before the Sunn; but the Latitude was so greate, that nothing appeared: So we went to see the rarities in the Library, where the Library keepers, shewed me my name, among the Benefactors: They have a Cabinet of some Medails, & Pictures of the Muscular parts of Mans body: Thence to the new Theatre, building now at an exceedingly & royal Expense by the L:A:B: of Canterbury, to keepe the Acts in for the future, 'til now being in St. Maries church: The foundation being but newly laied & the whole, Design'd, by that incomparable genius, & my worthy friend Dr. Chr: Wren, who shewed me the Model, not disdaining my advise in some particulars: Thence to see the Picture on the Wall over the Altar at All-Soules, being the largest piece of Fresco painting (or rather in Imitation of it, for tis in oyle [of Terpentine] in England, & not ill design'd, by the hand of one Fuller: yet I feare it will not hold long, & seemes too full of nakeds for a Chapell: Thence to New-Coll: & the Painting of Magdalens Chapell, which is on blue cloth in Chiaro Oscuro by one Greeneborow, being a Cœna Domini & Judgement <on> the Wall by Fuller, as is the other, somewhat varied: Next to Waddam, & the Physik Garden where were two large Locust Trees, & as many Platana, & some rare Plants under the Culture of old Bobart.
26: We came back to Beaconsfield, next day to Lond. where we dined at my L: Chancelors with my L: Belasis & divers greate persons:
<28> Being casualy in the Privy Gallery at White-hall, his Majestie gave me thanks (before divers Lords & noble men) for my Book of Architecture & Sylva againe: That they were the best designd & usefull for the matter & subject, the best printed & designd (meaning the Tallè doucès of the Paralleles) that he had seene: then caused me to follow him alone to one of the Windows, he asked me if I had any paper about me un-written, & a Crayon; I presented him with both, & then laying it on the Window stoole, he with his owne hands, designed to me the plot for the future building of White-hall, together with Roomes of State, & other particulars, which royal draft, though not so accurately don, I reserve as a rarity by me: After this he talked to me of severall matters, & asking my advice, of many particulars, in which I find his Majestie had an extraordin<ar>y talent, becoming a magnificent Prince: The same day, at Council (there being Commissioners to be made, to take care of such sick & Wounded, & Prisoners of War, as might be expected upon occasion of a succeeding Warr, and Action at sea; a War being already declared against the Hollanders) his Majestie was pleasd to nominate me to be one; amongst three other Gent: of quality, Parliament men: Viz: Sir William D'oily knight & Baronet, Sir Tho: Clifford [since L: Tressurer of England], & Bullein Rhemys Esquire, with a Sallary of 1200 pounds amongst us, besides extraordinares &c: for our care & attendance in time of action, each of us appointed his particular District, & mine falling out to be Kent, [&] Sussex: with power to constitu<t>e Officers, Physitians, Chirurgeons, Provost Martials &c: dispose of halfe of the Hospitals thro England: after which I kissed his Majesties hand, as did the rest of my Collegues when the Council was up: At this Council, I heard Mr. Solicitor Finch [since L: Chan] plead most elegantly the Merchants Cause, trading to the Canaries, that his Majestie would grant them a new Charter.
29 Was the most magnificent triumph by Water & Land of the Ld: Major, I dined at Guild-hall: the feast said to cost 1000 pounds: at the upper Table, placed next to Sir H: Bennet Secretary of State, just opposite to my L: Chancelor & the Duke of Buckingham, who sate between Mr. Comminges the Fr: Ambassador, Lord Tressurer, Dukes of Ormond, of Albemarle, E: of Manchester Lord Chamberlaine & the rest of the great officers of State: My Lord Major came twice up to us, first drinking in a Golden Goblett his Majesties health, then the French Kings (as a Complement to his Ambassador). Then we return'd my L: Majors health, the Trumpets, Drumms sounding: for the rest, the Cheere was not to be imagind for the Plenty & raritie, an infinitie of Persons at the rest of the Tables in that ample hall, so I slip'd away in the crowd & came home late:
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November
2: To Lond: Her Majestie Queene-mother came crosse the Gallerie in White-hall to give me thanks for my Book of Architecture, which I had presented to her, with a complement that I did by no means deserve: returnd that evening:
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7: To Lond: about our Commission, took leave of his R: Highnesse the Duke now going to sea, Generall of the fleete against the Dut<c>h: [&] I kissd his hand in his bed-chamber & returnd home:
10: I went to consult with my bro: Commissioners about settling our Officers:
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15: To Lond. We chose our Treasurer, Clearks, Messengers, appointed our seale, which I ordered should be the good Samaritan, with this motto, fac similiter:
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24: His Majestie was pleasd to tell me what the conference was with the Holland Ambassador which (as after I found) <was part of> the heads of the Speech he made at the reconvention of the Parliament, which now began: 24: I dined with the Commissioners for Sick & Wounded, & sate at Painters hall:
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December
1. Sate at Painter hall.
2. Sir William D'Oylie & myselfe deliverd the Pr: Councils letters to the Governors of St. Thomas Hospital in Southwark, that a mo<ie>tie of the house should be reserved for such sick & wounded as should from time to time be sent from the Fleete, during the War: This being dellivr<e>d at their Court, the President & severall Aldermen Governors of that Hospital invited us to a greate feast in Fishmong<e>rs hall:
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13 To Lond: Sate at Painters hall, where we perfected the Method for disposing of the sick.
14: met at the R: Society, where we had severall letters read, from correspondents beyond sea, about the Comet which now appeared: orders were given for accurate observations to our Curator &c:
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22: I went to the Launching of a new ship of two bottomes, invented by Sir William Petty by a Modell of Sir William Petty on which were various opinions: his Majestie present, gave her the name of the Experiment: so I came home, where I found Sir Humphrie Winch, & Mr. Phil. Packer who dined with me: This yeare I planted the Lower grove next the Pond:...
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28 Some of my poore Neighbours dined with me: & others of my Tennants with some Company from Lond:
The Comet appears 'twixt Aries & Cete north-west of the Pliades:
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