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1686


January
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6 I went to Lond: to our Office, din'd with the L. Arch-Bish: of Yorke, where was Peter-Walsh that Romish Priest, who was so well known for his moderation; professing the Ch: of England to be a true member of the Chatholique Church; he is used to go to our publique prayers without scrupule, did not acknowledge the Popes Infallibility, & onely primacy of Order &c. I returned this Evening:

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19 I went to Lond: pass'd the Privie Seale amongst others, the Creation of Mrs. Sidly (concubine to ...) Countesse of Dorchester, which 'tis certaine the Queene tooke very grievously: so as for two dinners, standing neere her, she hardly eate one morsel, nor spake one word to the King, or to any about her, who at all other times us'd to be extreamely pleasant, full of discourse & good humor:
The Roman Cath: were also very angrie, because the<y> had so long valu'd the Sanctite of their Religion & Prosleytes &c:
Dryden the famous play-poet & his two sonns, & Mrs. Nelle (Misse to the late...) were said to go to Masse; & such purchases were no greate losse to the Church.
This night was burnt to the Ground my Lord Montagues Palace in Bloom<s>bery; than which for Painting & furniture, there was nothing more glorious in England: This happen'd by the negligence of a servant, airing (as they call it) some of the goods by the fire, in a moist season; for indeede so wett & mild a Winter had scarce ben ever seene in mans memory:
At this Seale there also passed, the creation of Sir H: Walgrave to be a Lord: He had married one of the Kings natural Daughters, begotten on Mrs. Churchil: These two Seales, my Bro: Commissioners pass'd in the morning before I came to Towne, at which I was not at all displeas'd;
We likewise pass'd privy seales for 276000 pounds upon severall accounts, Pensions, Guards, Wardrobes, Privie purse &c, besids divers Pardons: & one more which I must not forget (& which by providence, I was not present at) one Mr. Lytcott, to be Secretarie to the Ambassador to Rome: we being three Commissioners [any] two were a Quorum.

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February

3 A Seale:
6: Being his Majesties day, on which he began his Reigne; By Order of Council, it was to be solemniz'd with a particular Office, & sermon, which the Bis: of Ely preached at W:hall: on 11:Numbers: 12: a Court-Oration, upon the Regal Office &c: It was much wonder'd at; that this day which was that of his late Majesties death, should be kept as festival, & not the day of the present Kings Coronation: It is said, that it had formerly ben the costome, though not 'til now, since the Reigne of K. James. 1.

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<20> Many bloody & notorious duels were fought about this time, The D: of Grafton kill'd Mr. Stanley, bro: to the E: of Shrewsbery, indeede upon an almost unsufferable provocation: It is hop'd his Majestie will now at last, severely remedy this unchristian Custome:

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March

1 Came Sir Gilb: Gerrard to treate with me about his sons marying my Daughter Susanna; The father being obnoxious, & in some suspicion & displeasure of the King, I would receive no proposal, 'til his Majestie had given me leave, which he was pleas'd to do: but after severall meetings, we brake off, upon his not being willing to secure any thing competant for my daughter<s> Children: besides that I found his estate to be most of it in the Coale-pits as far as N.Castle, & leases from the Bishop of Durrham, who had power to make concurrent Leases with other difficulties, so as we did not proceede to any conclusion:

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12 There was a doquett to be sealed importing a Lease of 21 yeares to one Hall, who styled himselfe his Majesties Printer (& lately turn'd Papist) for the printing Missals, Offices, Lives of Saints, Portals, Primers &c: books expressly forbidden to be printed or sold, &c by divers Acts of Parliament: which I refused to put the seale to, & made my exceptions against, so it was laied by:

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15 Came my Lady Sunderland to house-warming to my new Lodgings in White-hall:
16 I was at the [review of the] Army about Lond: which was in Hide-parke, the whole consisting of about 6000: horse & foote in excellent order &c: his Majestie & an infinity of people present:
17 I went to my house in the Country, refusing to be present at what was to passe the next day at the Privy-Seale:

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28 ... I supped this night at my L: Tressurers: discoursed with my Lady Tennet, who pretended to some more than ordinary talent of knowledge &c:
29 I return'd home:
The Duke of Northumberland (a Natural sonn of the late King, by the Dutchesse of Cleaveland, an impudent woman) marrying very meanely, with the help of his bro: Grafton, attempted to spirit away his Wife &c:
A Briefe was read in all the Churches for Relieving the French Protestants who came here for protection, from the unheard-off, cruelties of their King:

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April

15 I went to Mr. Cooks funerall, a Merchant my kind Neighbour at Greenewich where our Viccar preach'd the sermon: 2. Tim: 4:- 6.7.8: proper on the Occasion: Little Fr:Godolphin was now sick of the small pox, I pray God be gracious to that precious Chld: The Arch-Bish: of Yorke now died of the small-pox, aged 62 yeares, a Corpulent man; My special loving Friend, & whilst our Bish: of Rochester (from whence he was translated) my excellent Neighbour, an unexpressible losse to the whole Church, & that Province especialy, he being a learned, Wise, stoute, and most worthy prelate; so as I looke on this as a greate stroke to the poore Church of England now in this defecting period:
18 Our Viccar on his former Text & most of it repetition:
Afternoone I went to Camberwell to visite Dr. Par: but sate so inconveniently at Church, that I could very hardly heare his Text, which was 5.Heb:9: After sermon I went to the Doctors house, where he shew'd me The life and Letters of the late learned Primate of Armagh, Usher, and among them that letter of Bish: Bramhals to the Primate, giving notice of the popish practices to pervert this nation, by sending an hundred priests &c into England, who were to conforme themselves to all Sectaries, and Conditions for the more easily dispersing their doctrine amongst us: This Letter was the cause of the whole Impressions being seiz'd on, upon pretence, that it was a political or historical account, of things, not relating to Theologie, though it had ben licenc'd by the Bish: &c: which plainely shewe'd what an Interest the Popish now had, that a Protestant Booke, containing the life, & letters of so eminent a man was not to be publish'd. There were also many letters to & from most of the learned persons his correspondents in Europ: but The Booke will, (I doubt not) struggle through this unjust impediment.
20 To Lond: a seale - & to see little Godolphin now, I blesse God, in an hope full way of Escape: Severall Judges put out, & new complying ones put in.
24 I returned home, found my Coach-man dangerously ill of vomiting greate quantities of blood:

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May

5 To Lond: There being a Seale, it was feared we should be required to passe a Doquett, Dispensing with Dr. Obadia Walker & 4 more, wheroff one an Apostate Curate at Putney, the other Master of University Coll: Ox: to hold their Masterships, fellowships & Cures, & keepe pub: schooles & enjoy all former emoluments &c. notwithstanding they no more frequented, or used the pub: formes of Prayers, or Communion with the Church of England, or tooke the Test, & oathes of Allegeance & Supremacy, contrary to 20 Acts of Parliaments &c: which Dispensation being likewise repugnant to his Majesties owne gracious declaration at the begining of his Reigne, gave umbrage (as well it might) to every good Protestant: nor could we safely have passed it under the Privy-Seale: wherefore it was don by Immediate warrant, sign'd by Mr. Solicitor &c at which I was not a little glad: This Walker was a learned person, of a munkish life, to whose Tuition I had more than 30 yeares since, recommended the sonns of my worthy friend Mr. Hyldiard of Horsley in Surry: believing him to be far from what he proved, an hypocritical concealed papist, by which he perverted the Eldest son of Mr. Hyldyard, Sir Ed. Hales's eld: son & severall more [&] to the greate disturbance of the whole nation, as well as the University, as by his now publique defection appeared: All engines being now at worke to bring in popery amaine, which God in mercy prevent:
This day was burnt, in the old Exchange, by the publique Hang-man, a booke (supposed to be written by the famous Monsieur Claude) relating the horrid massacres & barbarous proceedings of the Fr:King against his Protestant subjects, without any refutation, that might convince it of any thing false: so mighty a power & ascendant here, had the French Ambassador: doubtlesse in greate Indignation at the pious & truly generous Charity of all the Nation, for the reliefe of those miserable sufferers, who came over for shelter:
About this time also, The Duke of Savoy, instigated by the Fr:King to exterpate the Protestants of Piemont, slew many thousands of those innocent people, so as there seemed to be a universal designe to destroy all that would not Masse it, thro<ugh> out Europ, as they had power, quod avertat D.O.M.
I procur'd of my L.president of the Council, the nomination of a son of Mrs. Cock, a Widdow (formerly living plentifully, now falln to want) to be chosen into the Charter-house Schoole, which would be a competent subsistence for him:
7 I return'd home:
8 Died my sick Coachman of his feavor, to my greate griefe, being a very honest, faithfull servant: I beseech the Lord, to take-off his afflicting hand, in his good time.
9 ... The Duke of Savoy, instigated by the French <king>, put to the sword many of his protestant subjects: No faith in Princes.
12 To Lond: Memorand, I refus'd to put the P: Seale to Dr. Walker<s> licence for the printing & publishing divers Popish Books &c: of which I complain'd both to my L: of Canterbury (whom I went to advise with, which was in the Council-chamber) and to my Lord Treasurer that evening at his lodging: My Lord of Cantorburies advise was that I should follow my owne Conscience therein; my Tressurer, that if in Conscience I could dispence with it; for any hazard, he believed there was none: Notwithstanding which I persisted not to do it:

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16 A stranger on: 2: Zeph: 1.2.3. Afternoone, on: 2.Tit:11.12 &c: both practical sermons exhorting to Repentance upon prospect of the ruines threatning the Church, & drawing on for our prodigious Ingratitude, & doubtlesse Never was England so perverted, through an almost universal face of prophanesse, perjury, luxurie, unjustice, violence, hypocrisie, Atheisme, & dissolution: A kingdome & a people so obliged to God, for its long prosperity, both in Church & state: so signaly delivered, and preserved: & now threatn'd to be destroyed, by our owne folly & wickednesse: How strangely is this nation fallen from its antient zeale & Integritie! unhappy, unthankfull people!

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June

2 To Lond: passing divers Pardons & other doquetts:
Such stormes, <raine> & foule weather hardly ever know<n> at this season: The Camp now on Hounslo-Heath forc'd for sicknesse and other Inconveniences of Weather to retire to quarters:

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9 To Lond: a Seale, most pardons, & discharges, of Knight Baronets fees; which having ben pass'd over for so many yeares, did greately dissoblige several families who had serv'd his Majestie. - The Camp now at Brainford [Hounslow] after exceeding <wet> & stormy weather, now as excessively hott; many grew sick: greate feasting there, especialy in my L:Dunbarton<s> quarters: many jealosies & discourse what the meaning of this incampment of an army should be: - L:Terconell gon to Ireland with greate powers & commissions - giving as much cause of talke as the other: especialy 19 new Pr:Councelors being now made & Judges, among which but three protestants: & Terconell made [L.] Generall: New-Judges also here, among which Milton a papist, & bro: to the Milton who wrot for the Regicides, who presum'd to take his place, without passing the Test: - Scotland, refuse to grant Liberty of Masse to the Papists in Scotland: - The French persecution more inhumane than ever &c: The Protestants in Savoy, successfully resist the French Dragoons, perfidiously murdering them. - The booke written by Monsieur Claude to informe the world of the cruel persecution by France: Translated here burnt by the hangman, so greate was the Interest of the Fr: Ambassador, as was said: It seem'd to relate onely matter of fact, very modestly: & was thought a severe treatement; his Majestie having both given protection, & reliefe to the Refugies: It was thought hard, that the people should not know for what & to whom they gave so bountifully. - The Kings chiefe physitian in Scotland, Apostasizing from the protestant Religion, dos of his owne accord publique Recantation at Edenbrugh. -
11 I went to see Midletons - receptacle of Waters at the New River1: & the new Spa wells neere it.
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27 ... I had this day ben married 39 yeares: Blessed be God for all his mercys.

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July

12 I went to visite Dr. Godolphin vice-Provost of Eton, & dined with him in the Colledge: among the Fellows: It is an admirable foundation:
13 I return'd to Lond: Note, that standing by the Queene at Basset (Cards) I observ'd that she was exceedingly concern'd for the losse of 80 pounds: her outward affability much changed to statelinesse & since she has ben exalted:
The season was very rainy, & inconvenient for the Camps: his Majestie cherefull:
14 Was sealed at our Office the Constitution of certaine Commissioners to take upon them the full power of all Ecclesiastical Affaires, in as unlimited a manner, or rather greater, than the late High-Commission Court, abbrogated by Parliament: for it had not onely faculty to Inspect & Visite all Bishops diocesses, but to change what lawes & statutes they shold think fit to alter, among the Colledges, though founded by private men; to punish [suspend] fine &c give Oathes, call witnesses, but the maine drift was to <suppresse> zealous Preachers &c - In summ, it was the whole power of Viccar General, note the Consequence - The Commissioners were of the Cleargy, the A Bish of Cant: Bishops of Duresme, Rochester:- of the Temporal: L:Tressurer, Chancellor (who alone was ever to be of the quorum) Chiefe Justice, L:President:

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19 To Lond: to a Seale. Came this morning to visi<t>e me Sir W: Godolphin, L. Sylvius: Mrs. Boscawen; Dr. Tenison, with divers Ladys & Gent: After dinner, I went to Lond, to a Seale. &c.
Return'd 21: Evening, having ben at the R:Society, where was a Wind Gun brought & tried, which first shot a bullet with a powder Charge, & then discharged 4 severall times with bullets, by the wind onely, every shoote at competent distance piercing a thick board: The Wind-Chamber was fastned to the barrill through the stock, with Valves to every <charge> so as they went off 4 successive times: I<t> was a very curious piece, made at Amsterdam, not bigger than a pretty Birding piece: Note, that the drawing up of the Cock alone <admitted> so much aire into a small receptacle at the britch of the piece out of the Chamber or magazine of aire underneath as suffic'd for a charge, which was exploded by pulling downe the Cock by the Triccker: (a) the wind Chamber [of brasse], to scrue into the barrell thro the stock, at (b): note, that it was fill'd with an [aire] pumpe:

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27 This day was bound Apprentice to me, & serve as a Gardner, Jonathan Mosse, to serve from 24 June 1686: to 24 June -92, being six yeares:

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August

8 ... I went to visite the Marquis de Ruvignie now my Neighbour at Greenewich, he had <been> 'til this cruel persecution in France (whence he was now retir'd) the Deputy of all the Protestants of that Kingdome in the Parliament of Paris, & severall times Ambassador in this & other Courts; a Person of greate Learning & experience:

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September

8. I went to Lond: to a Seale: The Bish: of Lond was on Monday suspended on pretence of not silencing Dr. Sharp of St. Giles's, for something of a sermon, in which he zealously reproov'd the Doctrine of the R.C. The Bish: having consulted the Civilians, who told him, he could not by any Law proceede against Dr. Sharp, without producing wittnesses, & impleading according to forme &c: But it was over-ruled by my L:Chancelor & the Bishop sentenc'd, without so much as being heard to any purpose: which was thought a very extraordinary way of proceeding, & universaly resented; & so much the rather, for that 2 Bish: Durham, & Rochester, sitting in the Commission, & giving their suffrages: The AB: of Cant: refusing to sit amongst them: What the issue of this will be, Time will shew:

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October

14: His Majesties Birth day, I was at his Majesties rising in his Bed-Chamber: Afterwards in the [Hide] Parke where his Majesties 4: Comp: of Guards were drawn up: Such horse & men as could not be braver: The Officers &c: wonderfully rich & gallant: They did not head their troops, but their next officers; the Colonels &c: being on Horse <back> by the King, whilst they marched: The Ladys not lesse splendid at Court, where was a Ball that night; but small appearance of qualitie: This day all the shops both in Citty & suburbs shut up, and kept as solemnly as any holy-day: Bone-fires at night in Westminster &c: but forbidden in the Citty:

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22 To Lond: the next day with my Lady the Countesse of Sunderland, I went [23] to Cranburne, a Lodge & walke of my Lord Godolphins, in Windsor parke: there was one roome in the house, spared in the pulling-downe the old one, because the late Dutchesse of Yorke, was borne in it, the rest was build & added to it by Sir Geo: Carteret, Tressurer of the Navy: & since the whole purchased by my Lord Godolphin, who spake to me to go see it, and advise what trees were fit to be cut downe, to improve the dwelling, it being invironed with old rotten pollards, which corrupt the aire: It stands on a knowle, which though insensibly rising, gives it a prospect over the keepe of Windsore, which is about three miles north-east of it: The ground is clayy & moist, the water stark nought: The Park is pretty; The house tollerable & gardens convenient: after dinner we came back to Lond, having 2 Coaches both going and coming, of 6 horses a-piece, which we changed at Hounslow:

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November

16 I went with part of my family to passe the melancholy winter in Lond: at my sonns house in Arundel Buildings:

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26 I din'ed at my L.Chancelors, where being 3 other Serjants at Law, after dinner being cherefull & free, they told their severall stories, how long they had detained their clients in tedious processes, by their tricks, as [if] so many highway thieves should have met & discovered the severall purses they had taken: This they made but a jeast of: but God is not mocked:

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December

16 I carried the Countesse of Sunderland to see the rarities of one Mr. Charleton at the Middle Temple, who shewed us such a Collection of Miniatures, Drawings, Shells, Insects, Medailes, & natural things, Animals whereoff divers were kept in glasses of Sp: of wine, I think an hundred, besids, Minerals, precious stones, vessels & curiosities in Amber, Achat, chrystal &c: as I had never in all my Travells abroad seene any either of private Gent: or Princes exceede it; all being very perfect & rare in their kind, espec<i>aly his booke of Birds, Fish: flowers, shells &c drawn & miniatured to the life, he told us that one book stood him in 300 pounds: it was painted by that excellent workeman whom the late Gastion duke of Orleans emploied: This Gent:'s whole Collection (gathered by himselfe travelling most parte of Europe) is estimated at 8000 pounds: He seem'd a Modest and obliging person:
This Evening I made a step to my house in the Country, where I stayed some dayes:

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Continue to 1687


J:E Sallis
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