re-FRAME

1688

January
***
15 Was a solemn & particular office used at our, & all the Churche<s> of London, & 10 miles about it, for thanksgiving to God for her Majesties being with child:

***

February
12 ... Wednesday before My Daughter Evelyn, going in the Coach to visite in the Citty, a Jolt (the doore being not fast-shut) flung her quite out of the Coach upon her back, in such manner, as the hind-wheles passed over both her Thighes a little above the knees: Yet it pleased God, besides the bruse of the Wheele upon her flesh, she had no other harme: We let her blood, anointed, & made her keepe bed 2 dayes, after which <s>he was able to walke & soone after perfectly well: Through God Almightys greate mercy to an Excellent Wife & a most dutifull & discreete daughter in Law:
17 After above 12 Weekes Indisposition, we now returned home much recovered: I now receiv'd the sad tidings of my Niepce Montagues death, who died at Woodcot the 15th: There had ben unkindnesses & Injuries don our family by my Sister-in-Law, her mother, which we did not deserve; & it did not thrive to the purposes of those who instigated her, to cause her da<u>ghter to cut-off an Intaile clandestinely: But Gods will be don, she has seene the ill effect of it, & so let it passe:

***

March
23 At white-Hall Dr. Sharp on 18: <Ezek:> 27.28: I returned home.
The Bish: of Oxford, Parker who so lately published, his extravagant Treatise about Transubstantiation & for abbrogating the Test & penal Laws, died: esteem'd a Violent, passionate haughty man, but being [yet] pressed to declare for the C. of Rome; he utterly refus'd it: A remarkable end:
The Fr: Tyrant, now finding he could make no proselytes amongst those Protestants of quality & others whom he had caused to be shut up in Dungeo<n>s & confin'd to Nunneries & Monastries; gave them after so long Tryal a general releasement, & leave to go out of the Kingdom, but Utterly taking away their Estates, & their Children; so as greate numbers came daily into England & other places, where they were received & relieved with very Considerable Christian Charity: This providence and goodnesse of God to those who thus constantly held out; did so work upon those miserable poore soules, who to avoy'd the persecution, sign'd their renuntiation, & to save their Estates, went to Masse; That reflecting on what they had don, grew so afflicted in their Consciences, as not being longer able to support it; They Unanimously in infinite number thro all the french provinces; Acquaint the Magistrates & Lieutenants that being sorry for their Apostacy; They were resolved to returne to their old Religion, that they would go no more to Masse, but peaceably assemble where they could, to beg pardon & worship God, but so without weapons, as not to give the least umbrage of Rebellion or sedition, imploring their pitty & commisseration: And accordingly meeting so from time to time, The Dragoon Missioners, popish Officers & Priests, fall upon them, murder & put to death who ever they could lay hold on, who without the least resistance embrace death, torture & hanging, with singing <psalmes> & praying for their persecutors to the last breath; yet still continuing the former Assembly of themselves in desert places, suffering with incredible Constancy, that through Gods mercy they might obtaine pardon for this Lapse: Such Examples of Christian behaviour has not been seene, since the primitive Persecution, by the Heathen: & doub<t>lesse God will do some signall worke in the end, if we can with patience & christian resolution hold out, & depend on his Providence:

***

28 I went to Lond: in the Evening, the next morning with Sir Charles Littleton to Sheene an house & estate given him by my Lord Brounchar, one who was ever noted for an hard, vicious man, had severall Bastards; but for his worldly Craft, & skill in gaming &c: few exceeding him: Coming to die, he bequeathed all his Land, House, furnitur &c intirely to Sir Charles, to whom he had no manner of Relation, but an antient friendship, contracted at the famous siege of Colchester 40 yeares before: It is a pretty place, fine gardens and well planted, & given to one worthy of them, Sir Charles being an honest Gent, & souldier; & brother to Sir Hen: Littleton of Worster shire, whose greate Estate he is to Inhe<r>ite, his Bro: being without Children: They are <descendants> of the greate Lawyer of that name & give same Armes & motto: He is married to one <Mrs.> Temple (formerly maide of Honor to the late Queene,) a beautifull Lady, & has many fine Children; so as none envy his good fortune.
After dinner (at his house) we went to see Sir William Temples, neere to it: The most remarkeable thing, is his Orangerie & Gardens; where the wall Fruite-trees are most exquisitely nailed & applied, far better than in my life I had ever noted: There are many good Pictures, especialy of V. dykes, in both these houses, & some few statues &small busts in the later: From hence we went to Kew, to Visite Sir Hen: Capels, whose Orangerie & Myrtetum, are most beautifull, & perfectly well kept: He was contriving very high palisados of reedes, to shade his Oranges in during the Summer, & painting those reedes in oyle: We return'd to Lond: in the Evening:

***

April
15 Easter day, at Deptford ... It was now a very dry, cold easterly windy, backward Spring: The Turkish Empire in greate intestine Confusion: The French persecution still raging, multitud<e>s of Protestants & many very Considerable greate & noble persons flying hither, produced a second general Contribution: The papists, (by Gods providence) as yet making small progresse amongst us.

***

May
13 ...The Hollanders did now al'arme his Majestie with their fleete, so well prepar'd & out before we were in any readinesse, or had any considerable number to have encounter'd them had there ben occasion, to the greate reproch of the nation, whilst being in profound peace, there was a mighty Land Army, which there was no neede of, & no force by Sea, where onely was the apprehension; [at present, but was doub<t>lesse kept & increased in order to bring in & Countenance Popery, the K beginning to discover his intention by many Instances, perverted by the Jesuites against his first seeming resolution to alter nothing in the Church Established, so as it appeared that there can be no relyance <o>n Popish promises.]
17 I went to Lond, to meete my Bro: G. Evelyn about our mutual concerne in the will of my Bro: Richard, by which, my Niepce Montague, dying without issue, a considerable Estate ought to have returned to our Family, after the decease of her husband: but thro the fraude & unworthy dealing of her mother, (my sister-in-Law), the intaile had ben cut off, & a recovery pass'd & consequently the Estate given to her husband Montag<u>e, through the perswasion of my sister, contrary to the intent of her husband my brother, & that to a son-in law who had lived dissolutly & Scandalously with another woman, & his dishonesty made publiquely notorious: What should move my sister in Law, professing so greate love to the memory of her husband, to [cause my Niepce to] give away not onely this, but considerably more, to a son in law, who had no Issue, from all her husbands relations, was strangely spoken off, especialy to one who had so scandalously & so basely abused her da<u>ghter:
18 The King injoyning [the ministers] the Reading his declaration for giving liberty of Conscience (as it was styled) in all the Churches of England: This Evening six Bishops, Bath & Wells, Peterborow, Ely, Chichester, St. Asaph, & Bristol, (in the name of all the rest) came to his Majestie to petition him that he would not impose the reading of it to the severall Congregations under their diocesse: not that they were averse to the publishing of it, for want of due tendernesse towards dissenters, in relation to whom they should be willing to come to such a temper, as should be thought fit, when that matter might come to be consider'd & settled in parliament & Convocation: But the declaration being founded upon such a dispencing power, as might at pleasure set aside all Lawes Ecclesiastical & Civil, it appeared to them Illegal, as doing so to the parliaments in -61 & 72; & that it was a point of such Consequence, as they could not so far make themselves parties to it, as the Reading of it in the Church in the time of divine service amounted to.
The King was so far incensed at this Addresse, that he with threatning expressions commanded them to obey him in reading of it at their perils, & so dismis'd them:

***

25 I visited Dr. Tenison, Secretary Pepys, of the Admiralty, Mr. Boile, Coll: Philips and severall of my Friends, all the discourse now being about the Bishops refusing to reade [the injunction for the abbrogation of] the Test &c: It seemes the Injunction came so crudely from the Secretarys office, that it was neither sealed nor sign'd in forme, nor had any Lawyer ben consulted; so as the Bishops who tooke all imaginable advice, put the Court to greate difficulties how to proceede against them: Greate were the Consults, and a Proclamation expected all this day; but no thing don: The action of the Bishop<s> universaly applauded, & reconciling many adverse parties, Papists nely excepted, who were now exceedingly perplex'd, & violent courses every moment expected: Report was the Protestant Secular Lords & nobility would abett the Cleargy: God knows onely the event.

The Queene Dowager obstinately bent hitherto on her returne into Portugal, now on the suddaine, upon pretence of a greate debt owing her by his majesties, declares her resolution to stay:
Newes of the most prodigious Earthquake, that was almost ever heard of, subverting the Citty of Lima & Country in Peru, with the dreadfull Innundation following it:

***

June
8 This day were the Arch-Bishop of Canterbery together with the Bishops of Ely, Chichester, St. Asaph, Bristol, Peterborow & Bath & Wells, sent from the Privy Council, Prisoners to the Tower, for refusing to give baile for their appearance (upon their not reading the Declaration for Liberty of Conscience) because in giving baile, they had prejudiced their Peerage: Wonderfull was the concerne of the people for them, infinite crowds of people on their knees, beging their blessing & praying for them as they passed out of the Barge; along the Tower wharfe &c:
10 A young prince borne &c. [which will cost dispute.]
10 Dr. Bohune preached this Trinity-Sonday on 2. Rom:15:
About two a clock, we heard the Toure Ordnance discharge, & the Bells ringing; for the Birth of a Prince of Wales; This was very surprizing, it being universaly given-out, that her Majestie did not looke til the next moneth:

***

13 I went to the Tower to see the Bishops now there in Prison, for not complying with his Majesties commands to Cause his declaration to be read in their Diocesse; where I visited the A:Bish: B: of Ely, Asaph, & Bath & Wells:

***

15 The Bish: came from the Tower to Westminster upon their Habeas Corpus & after divers houres dispute before the Judges, by their Counsel, upon security to appeare friday fortnight, were dismiss'd: Their Counsel alledged false Imprisonment & abatement of their Committment for want of some words: Denyed the paper given privately to the K. to be a seditious libel or that it was ever published: but all was over-ruled: W<r>ight, Alibon, Hollowell & Powell were the Judges: Finch, Sawyer, Pollixfen & Pemberton, their Counsel, who pleaded incomparably, [so as the Jury quitted them.] There was a lane of people from the Kings Bench to the water-side, upon their knees as the Bishops passed & repassed to beg their blessing: Bon fires made that night, & bells ringing, which was taken very ill at Court and an appearance of neere 60 Earles & Lords &c upon the bench in honor of the Bishops, & which did not a little comfort them; but indeede they were all along full of Courage & cherefull:
Note that they denyed to pay the Lieutennant of the Tower: (Hales who us'd them very surlily) any Fees, denying any to be due: I Introduc'd Sir Jo: Hoskins Master of the Chancery to my Lord President, who received him being in bed: &c:
Supped at the E: of Clarendons, where I found the Bishops of St. Asaph, and Norwich &c:
***

July
8 ... In the meane time more viru<le>ntly did the popish priests, in their sermons against the C. of England, raging at the successe of the Bishops, as being otherwise no ways able to carry their Cause against their learned Adversaries confounding them by both disputes & writings:

***

12 I return'd home; The Camp now began at Hounslow, but their nation in high discontent:
The 2 Judges, who favour'd the Cause of the Bish: had their writ of Ease: greate wroth meditating against the Bish: Cleargy & Church:
Coll: Titus, Sir H. Vane (son of him who was executed for his Treason) & some others of the Presbyt: & Indep: party, Sworn of the Privy Council, hoping thereby to divert that party, from going-over to the Bishops & C: of England, which now they began to do: as forseeing the designes of the papists to descend & take in their most hatefull of heretiques (as they at other time believed them) to effect their owne ends, which was now evidently, the utter extirpation of the C. of Eng: first, & then the rest would inevitably follow:

***

17 I went to Lond: with my Wife &c: & This night were the fire-works plaied, which were prepar'd for the Queenes up-sitting: We stood at Mr. Pepys's Secretary of the Admiralty to greate advantage for the sight, & indeede they were very fine, & had cost some thousands of pounds about the pyramids & statues &c: but were spent too soone, for so long a preparation:

***

29 ... My Wife was ataqu'd with a suddaine fit of fainting, at dinner, but without any sensible convulsion; which yet to prevent, she was immediately let blood, & I blesse God soone restored:

***

August
10 To Lond. Din'd with Sir William Godolphin, return'd: [Dr. Tenison now told me there would suddainly be some greate thing discovered, which happened to be the P: of O: intended coming:]

***

[15] ... to Althorp in Northamptonshire, it being 70 miles, which in 2 Coaches one [of 4 horses] that <tooke> me & my son up at white-hall & carried us to Dunstaple, where we arived & dined at noone, & another there of 6 horses, which carried us to Althorp 4 miles beyond N-hampton, by 7 a clocke that evening; both these Coaches laied for me alone, by that noble Countesse of Sutherland, who Invited me to her house at Althorp, where she entertaind me & my son with very extraordinary kindnesse, and convey'd us back againe to London in the very same noble manner, both going & coming, appointing a Dinner for us, at Dunstaple, as soone as we came to the Inn: I stayed with her Ladyship 'til the Thursday following.
18 Dr. Jessup the Minister of Althorp, who was my Lords Chaplaine, when Ambassador in France, preached on the shortest discourse I ever heard: but what was defective in the amplitude of his sermon, we found supplied in the largenesse, & convenience of the Parsonage house, which the Doctor (who had in spiritual advancements, at least 600 pounds per Annum) had new-built, fit for any person of quality to live in, with Gardens & all accommodations) according.
20 My Lady carried us to <Castle Ashby> my Lord of Northamptons Seate, a very strong large house built of stone, not altogether modern: they were now inlarging the Gardens, in which was nothing extraordinary but the Yron gate, opening into the Parke, which is indeede very good worke, wrought in flowers, painted with blew & gilded; & there is a very noble Walke of Elmes towards the front of the house by the Bowling Greene: I was not in any roomes of the house besides a lobby looking into the Garden, where my Lord, and his new Countesse (Sir St: Foxes daughter, whom I had known from a very Child) entertained the Countesse of Sunderland & her daughter the Countesse of Arran, (newly married to the son of the Duke of Hamilton) with so little good grace, & so dully, that our Visite was very short, & so we return'd to Althorp: which is 12 miles distant:
The Earle of Sunderlands House, or rather palace at Althorp, is a noble uniforme pile, in forme of an built of brick & freestone, balustred, & a la moderne; The Hale is well, the Staircase incomparable, the roomes of State, Gallerys, Offices, & Furniture such as [may] become a greate Prince: It is situated in the midst of Gardens, exquisitely planted & kept, & all this in a parke wall'd with hewn stone; planted with rowes & walkes of Trees; Canales & fish ponds, stored with Game: & what is above all this, Govern'd by a Lady, that without any shew of solicitude; keepes every thing in such admirable order both within & without, from the Garret, to the Cellar; That I do not believe there is any in all this nation or any other, exceeds her: all is in such exact order, without ostentation, but substantialy greate & noble; The meanest servant lodged so neate & cleanely, The Services at several Tables, the good order & decenccy, in a word the intire Oeconomie perfectly becoming, a wise & noble person, & one whom for her distinguishing esteeme of me from a long & worthy friendship; I must ever honour & Celebrate: & wish, I do from my Soule; The Lord her Husband (whose parts & abilit<i>es are otherwise conspicuous) were as worthy of her, as by a fatal Apostacy, & Court ambition, as he has made himselfe unworthy: This is what she deplores, & renders her as much affliction, as a Lady of a greate Soule & much prudence is capable of: The Countesse of Bristol her mother, a grave & honorable Lady has the comfort of seing her daughter & Grand-children under the same Oeconomie, especialy, Mr. Charles Spencer, a Youth of extraordinary hopes, very learned for his age & ingenious, & under a Governor of Extraordinary worth: Happy were it, could as much be said, <of> the Elder Bro: the Lord Spencer, who rambling about the world, dishonors both his name & family, adding sorrow to sorrow, to a Mother, who has taken all imaginable care of his Education: but vice more & more predominating, gives slender hopes of his reformation: He has another sister very Young, married to the Earle of Clancartie to a greate & faire Estate in Ireland, which [yet] gives no greate presage of worth; so universaly contaminated is the youth of this corrupt & abandoned age: But this is againe recompens'd by my Lord Arran, a sober & worthy Gent: & who has Espoused the Lady Ann Spencer, a young lady of admirable accomplishments & vertue:
23d I left this noble place, & Conversation on the 23d, passing through Northampton, which having lately ben burnt & reedified, is now become a Towne, that for the beauty of the buildings especialy the Church, & Towne-house, may compare with the neatest in Italy itselfe:
24 Hearing my poore wife, had ben ataqu'd with her late Indisposition I hasted home this morning, & God be pra<i>sed found her much amended.
Dr. Sprat: Bish of Rochester, writing a very honest & handsome letter to the Commissioners Ecclesiastical; excuses himselfe from sitting no longer amongst them, as by no meanes approving of their prosecution of the Cleargy who refus'd to reade his Majesties declaration for liberty of Conscience, in prejudice of the Church of England &c:
The French Arme & threaten the Election of the Elect: of Colin: The Dutch make extraordinary preparations both at sea & land which (with the very small progresse popery makes amongst us) puts us to many difficulties:
The popish Irish Souldiers commit many murders & Insolences; The whole Nation dissaffected & in apprehensions: what the event will prove God onely knows:
After long trials of the Doctors, to bring up the little P: of Wales by hand (so-many of her Majesties Children having died Infants) not succeeding: A country Nurse (the wife of a Tile-maker) is taken to give it suck:

***

September
18 I went to Lond: where I found the Court in the uttmost consternation upon report of the Pr: of Oranges landing, which put White-hall into so panic a feare, that I could hardly believe it possible to find such a change:
Writs issued now in order to the Parliament, & a declaration to back the good order of Elections, with greate professions of maintaining the Ch: of England: but without giving any sort of satisfaction to people, who now began to shew their high discontent at several things in the Government: how this will end, God onely can tell:

***

30 ... The Court &c in [so] extraordinary consternation upon assurance of the Pr: of Oranges intention of Landing, as the Writs which were sent forth to choose Parliament men, were recalled &c:
***

October
6: I went to Lond: [7] The next day being Sonday Dr. Tenison viccar of St. Martins, preached on 2: Tim: 3.16. shewing the Scripture to be our undoubted & onely Rule of Faith, & its perfection above all other Traditions & Writings, most excellently proved; after which the Communion was celebrated to neere 1000 devout people. This sermon chiefly occasioned by an impertinent Jesuite who in their Masse-house the Sunday before had disparaged the Scripture & railed at our Translation with extraordinary ignorance & impudence; which some present contradicting, they pulled him out of the Pulpit, & treated him very coursely, insomuch as it was like to create a very greate disturbance in the Citty:
Hourely dreate on expectation of the Pr: of Oranges Invasion still heightned to that degree, as his Majestie thought fit to recall the Writes of Summons of Parliament; to abbrogate the Commission for the dispencing power, [but retaining his owne right still to dispense with all Laws &] restore the ejected Fellows of Magdalen College Oxon: But in the meane time called over 5000 Irish, 4000 Scots; continue<s> to remove protestants & put papists into Portsmouth & other places of Trust: & retaines the Jesuites about him, which gave no satisfaction to the nation, but increasing the universal discontent, brought people to so desperate a passe as with the uttmost expressions even passionately seeme to long for & desire the landing of that Prince, whom they looked on as their deliverer from popish Tyrannie, praying uncessantly for an Easterly Wind, which was said to be the onely remora of his expedition, with a numerous Army ready to make a descent; To such a strange temper & unheard of in any former age, was this poore nation reduc'd, & of which I was an Eye witnesse: The apprehension was (& with reason) that his Majesties Forces, would neither at land or sea oppose them with that viggour requisite to repell Invaders:
The late Imprisoned Bishops, were now called to reconcile matters, & the Jesuites hard at worke to foment confusions amongst the Protestants, by their usual tricks &c: [Leter sent the AB. of Cant informing from a good hand what was contriving by the Jesuits: &c:]
9 I return'd the 9th - A paper of what the Bishops advised his Majestie [was publish'd] A [forme of] prayer, the Bishops were injoy<n>'d to prepare [an office] against the feared Invasion.
A pardon published: Souldiers & Mariners daily pressed &c.
14 The Kings Birth-day, no Gunns from the Tower, as usualy: The sunn Eclips'd at its rising: This day signal for the Victory of William the Conqueror against Herold neere Battel in Sussex: The wind (which had hitherto ben West) all this day East, wonderfull expectation of the Dutch fleete.

***

<28> I din'd with Sir W: Godolphin: [A Tumult in Lond on the rabble demolishing a popish Chapell set up in the Citty.]
29 My Lady Sunderland acquainted me at large his Majesties taking away the Seales from her husband, & of her being with the Queene to interceede for them: It is conceiv'd he grew remisse of late in pursuing the Interest of the Jesuitical Counsels, some reported one thing, some another; but there was doubtlesse some seacret betraied, which time may discover:
There was a Council now cald, to which were summon'd the A:Bish of Cant. &<c>: Judges, Lord Major &c: Q:Dowager, all the Ladies & Lords, who were present at the Q:Consorts labour, upon oath to give testimonie of the Pr: of Wales's birth, which was recorded, both at the Council board, & at the Chancery a day or two after: This procedure was censur'd by some, as below his Majestie to condescend to, upon the talke of Idle people: Remark-able on this occasion, was the refusal of the A: Bish: Marq: Halifax, Earles of Clarendon & Notinghams refusing to sit at the Council Table in their places, amongst Papists, & their bold telling his Majestie that what ever was don whilst such sate amongst them was unlawfull, & incurr'd præmunire: if at least, it be true, what I heard:
I din'd with my Lord Preston, now made Secretary of state in place of the E. of Sunderland: Visited Mr. Boile, where came in Duke Hamilton & E. of Burlington: The Duke told us many particulars of Mary Q: of Scots, and her amours with the Italian favorite &c:
30. I dined with the Secretary of the Admiralty, visited Dr. Tenison:
31. My Birthday, being the 68 yeare of my age: ô Blessed Lord, grant, that as I advance in yeare<s>, so I may improve in Grace: Be thou my protector this following yeare, & preserve me & mine from these dangers and greate confusions, which threaten a sad revolution to this sinfull Nation: Defend thy Church, our holy Religion, & just Lawes, disposing his Majestie to harken to sober & healing Counsels, yet if it be thy blessed will we may still enjoy that happy Tranquility which hitherto thou hast continued to us. Amen: Amen:
I din'd at my sonns:

November
1. Dined with my L: Preston againe, with other company, at Sir St: Foxes:
Continual al'armes of the Pr: of Oranges landing, but no certainty; reports of his greate losses of horse in the storme; but without any assurance. A Man was taken with divers papers & printed Manifests, & carried to Newgate after examination at the Cabinet-Council: There was likewise a declaration of the States, for satisfaction of all publique Ministers in their Dominions, the reason of their furnishing the Prince with their Vessels & Militia on this Expedition, which was delivered to all the Ambassadors & publique Ministers at the Hague except to the English & French:
There was in that of the Princes, an expression as if the Lords both Spiritual & Temporal &c had invited him over, with a deduction of the Causes of his enterprise: This made his Majestie Convene my L: of Cant: & the other Bishops now in Towne, to [give] them an account of what was in the Manifesto: & to enjoyne them to cleare themselves by <some> publique writing of this disloyal charge.
2 It was now certainly reported by some who saw the Pr: imbarke, and the fleete, That they sailed from Brill on Wednesday Morning, & that the Princesse of Orange was there, to take leave of her Husband, [3] & so I returned home.
4 ... Fresh reports of the Pr: being landed somewher about Portsmouth or Ile of Wight: whereas it was thought, it would have ben north ward: The Court in greate hurry -
5 Being the anniversary of the powder plot, our Viccar preach'd on 76. Psal. 10. by divers Instances: shewing the disasters & punishments overtaking perfidious designes.
8 I went to Lond: heard the newes of the Princes of Oranges being landed at Tor-bay, with a fleete of neere 700 saile, so dreadfull a sight passing through the Channell with so favorable a Wind, as our Navy could by no meanes intercept or molest them: This put the King & Court into greate Consternation, now employed in forming an Army to incounter their farther progresse: for they were gotten already into Excester, & the season, & wayes very improper for his Majesties forces to march so greate a distance:
The A Bish of Cant, & some few of the other Bishops, & Lords in Lond. were sent for to White-hall, & required to set forth their abhorrency of this Invasion, They assured his Majestie they had never invited any of the Princes party or were in the least privy to this Invasion, & would be ready to shew all testimonies of their Loyalty &c: but as to a publique declaration, they being so few, desired that his majestie would call the rest of their brethren & peeres, that they might consult what was fit to do on this occasion, not thinking it convenient to publish any thing without them, & untill they had themselves seene the Princes Manifest, in which it was pretended he was invited in by the Lords Sp: & temporal: This did not please his Majestie: So they departed: There came now out a Declaration, prohibiting all people to see or reade the Princes Manifest; in which was at large set-forth the cause of his Expedition, as there had ben on<c>e before one from the States: These are the beginnings of Sorrows, unlesse God in his Mercy prevent it, by some happy reconcil-iation of all dissentions amongst us, which nothing in likelihood can Effect but a free Parliament, but which we cannot hope to see, whilst there are any forces on either side: I pray God protect, & direct the King for the best, & truest Interest of his People: [I saw his Majestie touch for the Evil, Piters the Jesuit & F. Warner officiating in the Banqueting house]
I dined at Dr. Godolphins, with Mrs Boscawen &c at her house warming in his prebends house near S. Paules: Lay at my sonns, & [9] returned home the next day.
11 ... My deare Wife fell very ill of the gravell &c in her kidnies this afternoone. God in mercy give her ease & comfort:
The Pr. of Orange increases every day in forces, several Lords go in to him; The King gos towards Salisbery with his Army; doubtfull of their standing by him, Lord Cornbery carrys some Regiments from him, marches to Honiton, the Princes head quarters; The Citty of Lond: in dissorder by the rabble &c who pull-downe the Nunery at St. Johns, newly bought of the Papists of my Lord Berkeley: The Queene [prepare<s> to] <go> to Portsmouth for safty: to attend the issue of this commotion, which has a dreadfull aspect:
18 ... It was now very hard frost:
The King gos to Salisbery to rendevouze the Army, and returning back to Lond: Lord De la Mare appears for the Pr: in Cheshire: The nobility meete in Yorkshire: The ABish & some Bishops, & such peeres as were in Lond: addresse to his Majestie to call a Parliament: The King invites all forraine nations to come over: The French take all the Palatinat, & alarme the Germans more than ever:

***

29 I went to the R: Society, we adjourn'd Election of Præsident til. 23. Aprill by reason of the publique commotions, yet dined together as of custome on this day:

December
2 ... Visited my L. Godolphin, then going with the Marquis of Halifax, & E: of Notingham as Commissioner to the Prince of Orange: He told me, they had little power: Plymoth declared for the Prince & L: Bath: Yorke, Hull, Bristoll, all the eminent nobility & persons of quality throout England declare for the Protestant Rel<i>gion & Laws, & go to meete the Prince; who every day sets forth new declarations &c: against the Papists: The Greate favorits at Court, priest<s> & Jesuites, flie or abscond: Every thing (til now conceiled) flies abroad in publique print, & is Cryed about the streetes: Expectations of the Pr: coming to Oxon: Pr: of Wales & greate Treasure sent daily to Portsmouth, Earle of Dover Governor: Addresse from the Fleete not gratefull to his Majestie: The Popists in offices lay down their Commissions & flie: Universal consternation amongst them: it lookes like a Revolution: Herbert, beates a french fleete:
7 My son went towards Oxon: I returned home:
9 Our Lecturer on 122. Psal: 6: Pray for the peace of Jerusalem: Lord Sunderland meditating flight, I writ to my Lady, advised an Apologie:
13 I went to Lond: [The rabble people demolish all Papists Chapells & severall popish Lords & Gent: house<s>, especialy that of the Spanish Ambassador, which they pillaged & burnt his Library,
&c:]
16 Dr. Tenison at St. Martins on: 8:Isay:11:
I din'd at my L. Clarendons: The King flies to sea, [putts in at Feversham for ballast is rudely detained by the people: comes back to W<hite>hall.]
The Pr: of Orange now advanc'd to Windsor, is invited by the King to St. James, the messenger sent was the E. of Feversham the general of the forces: who going without Trumpet or passeport is detained prisoner by the Prince: The Prince accepts the Invitation, but requires his Majestie to retire to some distant place, that his owne Guards may be quartered about the palace & Citty: This is taken heinously, so the King gos away privately to Rochester: Is perswaded to come back: comes on the Sunday; Goes to masse & dines in publique, a Jesuite says grace: [I was present] That night a Council, [17] his Majestie refuses to assent to all proposals; gos away againe to Rochester:
18 The Pr: comes to St. James, fills W-hall (the King taking barge to Gravesend at 12 a Clock) with Dut<c>h Guard: A Council of Peres meete about an expedient to call a parliament: Adjourne to the House of Lords: The Chancelor, E. of Peterbor, & divers Priests & other taken: E: of Sunderlands flies & divers others, Sir E: Hales, Walker & other taken & secured: All the world go to see the Prince at St. James where is a greate Court, there I saw him & severall of my Acquaintance that come over with him: He is very stately, serious & reserved: The Eng: souldiers &c. sent out of Towne to distant quarters: not well pleased: Divers reports & opinions, what all this will end in; Ambition & faction feared:
21 I visited L. Clarendon where was the Bishops of Ely & St. Asaph: we had much discourse of Afairs: I returned home:
23 Our Lecturer at Deptford: on: 1. Mark: 3:
24 The King passes into France, whither the queen & child wer gon a few days before.
25 Christmas day, our Lecturer on his former Text; The holy Communion followed, at which I received:
26 The Peeres & such Commons as were members of the Parliament at Oxford, being the last of Charles the first: meeting, desire the Pr: of Orange to take on him the Government, & dispose of the publique Revenue 'til a Convention of Lords & Commons should meete in full body, appointed by his Circulary Letters to the Shires & Borrowghs 22. Jan:
I had now quartered on me a Lieutenant Coll: & 8 horses:
30 Our Lecturer on 122. Psal: 6: Pomerid: a Stranger on 6. Eccles: This day Prayers for the Prince of Wales were first left off in our Church pew & pulpet.
Greate preparations of all the Princes of Europ, against the French &c: the Emp: making peace with the Turke:



J:E Sallis
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